Find Your Niche: Key Elements in the Job Search Process

By Lexie Dy  readyjob.org

Photo By:  Pixabay

Find Your Niche: Key Elements in the Job Search Process

Conducting a job search these days is a bit different than it was just a few years ago. Technology has changed the way employers reach out to and interact with prospective hires, which has made it necessary to add a few skills and tools to your job hunt. The days of printing out multiple resumes and cover letters and stuffing them in envelopes are largely in the past. Speed, efficiency, and access are nearly as important as the information you provide about yourself.

Technology has altered the nature of work itself, so it’s reasonable to assume that the way people go about finding work should have changed as well. The good news is that most of these changes are to your benefit; they’re designed to help focus a job search and get your information to the right individuals and speed up the interviewing process, which can take considerable time depending on everyone’s availability. Taking advantage of the “new norm” in the job hunting and hiring process is entirely to your benefit.

Business Opportunities

Of course, even a well-prepared and comprehensive job search may not turn up the kind of position you’re looking for. If things don’t pan out, consider a business opportunity with long-term growth potential. The gig economy and popularity of web-based businesses have created many new business opportunities. There are a number of business ideas to take advantage of; for example, the drone market is a growth-oriented business idea, particularly selfie drones, which allow people to take photos of themselves from different angles. Wireless earphones are another new business niche with high-growth potential.

Photo By: Pixabay

Calling Card

However, no matter what job you plan to pursue, your resume is still your the single most important element you have at your disposal. It’s your calling card, and usually your best hope for getting someone’s attention. Stick to the basics and keep it simple. Remember, hiring managers and department heads don’t have a lot of spare time. A six-page resume is unlikely to get you very far. Maintain a succinct, subject-verb-object word order in your writing, avoid unnecessary and superfluous verbiage, and reserve your innermost thoughts for your diary. Use numbers to quantify and draw attention to your achievements, and restrict contact information to a phone number and email address (many people also include a Linkedin URL).

Interview Skills

It’s always a good idea to sharpen your interview skills and to be ready for some of the more difficult questions you may get. An increasing number of companies use Skype to conduct interviews, which eliminates the need to travel long distances for an interview. If you’ve never interviewed via Skype or FaceTime, it may be worthwhile getting comfortable with the format of a video presentation. Consider practicing with a friend or former co-worker.

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Online Presence

Employers are more oriented than ever toward finding prospects through social media, individual websites, and an individual’s overall online presence. Spend some time refining your Linkedin profile, and make sure there’s nothing on your Facebook page you wouldn’t want an employer to see. Think of it as you would a resume, so keep your information concise and informative.

 

Photo By: Pixabay

Online Portfolio

An online portfolio is an opportunity to let employers see what you’ve done in the past and what kind of work you’re capable of performing. A portfolio might include business plans, executive briefs, articles you’ve written, and pertinent blog entries. Think carefully about what you should include in a portfolio, and avoid items that have little or nothing to do with what the job entails.

Job seeking may have changed a lot over the years, but the essentials are much the same. A fine-tuned resume, good interviewing skills, and an openness to new opportunities can take you a long way in business.